Avitar Notes Significance Of New Oral Fluid Drug Testing Laws

Armen Hareyan's picture
Advertisement

Oral Fluid Drug Testing Laws

Avitar highlights the importance of the State of Hawaii's recent updating of their workplace drug testing laws to incorporate oral fluid-based on-site technology and its associated benefits.

Advertisement

"The State of Hawaii's new law enabling on-site oral fluid-based drug testing dramatically improves any company's ability to promote a drug free workplace and truly manage on-the-job drug abuse," said Pete Phildius, Chairman & CEO of Avitar. "Most employers know that workplace drug abuse is as bad if not worse than ever," continued Phildius. "The convenience of on- site oral fluid testing, when compared to traditional laboratory-based urine drug testing, will play an important role in reversing this costly trend."

In response to the support of multiple trade unions and industries, Hawaii enacted a new law which went into effect July 1, 2007, allowing companies that previously used laboratory-based urinalysis to use newer on-site oral fluid- based technology.

"Drug and alcohol abuse remain a problem in Hawaii's workforce. The law will go a long way towards helping to promote a drug-free workplace. This measure provides a cost effective on-the-job alternative to lab tests that can be costly and difficult to schedule." -- Lt. Governor Aiona.

The construction industry in particular advocated the need to replace urine-based testing, noting that on-site oral fluid devices are cheaper, faster and easier to use than urinalysis. Traditional urine testing typically takes several days to obtain results, and requires applicants or employees to go to specified collections sites/clinics. On-site oral fluid technology provides initial results within 5-15 minutes at a fraction of the cost of urine lab tests. Any non-negative on-site test results can also be confirmed in a laboratory using oral fluid. Lastly, oral fluid technology enables observed specimen collection. This is also a very important feature due to the prevalent practice of substance abuse "beating" urine-based testing techniques.

Advertisement