EmaxHealth

Health knowledge and news provided by doctors.

Ads by Google

Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most challenging diseases of our time, and new research is being conducted all the time. The latest Alzheimer’s study results as well as information on prevention, treatment, caregiving, and respite can be found on Emaxhealth.

Life After an Alzheimer's Diagnosis: Paliative Care and Hospice Explained

Alzheimer's Diagnosis and Paliative Care

Several years ago, I ran my very special group for the Alzheimer's Association that was for the person who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or another form of dementia AND their spouse, family members and caregivers. My goal throughout the many years that we met, was to educate and prepare everyone so that they could concentrate on making the most of their lives together instead of worrying what tomorrow would bring. No one in the group wanted to hear about hospice.

The Alzheimer's Disease Mortality Rate May Be Higher Than Officially Reported

Elderly Woman

Studies show that Alzheimer’s disease may be killing more than 500,000 people in the United States each year, which would make Alzheimer’s disease the third leading killer behind heart disease and cancer. More than 5 million people have a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States. That number is expected to triple by 2050 with the aging of the “Baby Boom” generation if there are no significant medical breakthroughs until then.

Vascular Dementia is Not Alzheimer's Disease

vascular dementia is not Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, and there’s so much discussion about it that it’s easy to overlook the second most common one—vascular dementia. A recent report in Diabetes Care brought to light the importance of understanding vascular dementia, as it’s been shown that women with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of developing this form of dementia—rather than Alzheimer’s—than are men.

Sundowning symptoms and how they are experienced

Sundowning and symptoms

Sundowning is a phenomenon that is associated with increased confusion resulting in a variety of behaviors that you may not see other times of the day. It can happen with any form of dementia. Up to about 50% of persons diagnosed with some form of dementia may experience sundowning. I have my own personal theories about why it happens when it does. Keep in mind that for each person, sundowning may occur at different times of the day - it's called sundowning because it happens later in the day for a lot of people.

Managing Dementia Behaviors Is Easier Than You Think

Alzheimer's disease patient

Medical students are often taught, “When you hear hoofs, think horses, not zebras”. Zebra is a metaphor for symptoms, a condition, illness or disease that may be obscure, rare, scary or difficult to manage. The way to identify the sound of the hoof beats is to rule out the zebra. Maybe managing a dementia patient’s behavior is as easy as riding a horse as oppose to a riding a wild zebra.

Faces Change, Hearts Don't: Alzheimer's is Stealing My Mom

Alzheimer's Patients Have the Same Heart

I hear so many people say that they are devastated because they have lost their loved one to Alzheimer’s disease even though their loved one is still living. “Alzheimer’s disease has stolen my mom.” “My mother doesn’t know who I am” “She isn’t the same person.” My response is, “She is the same person she was 10 years ago, 40 years ago.” She is an elderly, forgetful, younger version of the person you call mom.

Surviving The Waves of Dementia Care Grief

Dementia caregiving

If you are caring for someone with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or another form of dementia, you've certainly been sailing on a tumultuous sea of emotions. Although you may have educated yourself about the disease and what to expects as the disease progresses, we all dread the reality that our loved one will soon be gone altogether.

Have researchers finally uncovered the cause of Alzheimer's disease?

Previously overlooked brain finding could be Alzheimer's breakthrough.

University of Montreal researchers have made what they describe as a breakthrough discovery that could finally provide drugs that treat and possibly prevent Alzheimer's disease. The new finding that had been previously overlooked suggests fatty deposits in the brain may be the cause of Alzheimer's disease that affects 47.5 million people worldwide.

9 Risk Factors Contribute Most to Alzheimer's Disease

risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

Currently, Alzheimer’s disease has no cure, but in a new study researchers have identified 9 risk factors that contribute to the majority of Alzheimer’s disease cases. The fact that these risk factors can be modified to some degree offers the possibility that individuals can help ward off development of this devastating condition.

New insight into why older brains prone to Alzheimer's disease

Researchers uncover why aging brain more susceptible to Alzheimer's

No one knows exactly what causes Alzheimer's disease. Researchers know the risk of the most severe form of dementia increases with aging. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have now discovered what happens in the brain as we get older to raise our chances of Alzheimer's disease.

How Sleeping Position May Fight Alzheimer's

sleeping position and Alzheimer's

The prayer that begins “Now I lay me down to sleep” may acquire a whole new meaning if the findings of a recent study from Stony Brook University School of Medicine can be applied to humans. A research team reported that “the lateral position during sleep has advantage with regard to the removal of waste products including Aβ [amyloid-beta],” the accumulation of which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Progress in Alzheimer's Research for Effective Treatments

Alzheimer's disease treatment research

Perhaps one of the greatest fears that people face as they age is developing Alzheimer’s disease. This chronic and incurable disease afflicts more than five million Americans who suffer gradual onset and progression of memory and other cognitive losses to the extent that they can no longer care for themselves.

Pages