Neurotherapeutics Features New Treatments For Alzheimer's Disease

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The editors of Neurotherapeutics are pleased and proud to announce their July issue, devoted to "Novel Therapeutics for Alzheimer's Disease." Neurotherapeutics (www.neurotherapeutics.org/) is the journal of the American Society of Experimental NeuroTherapeutics (ASENT) www.asent.org.

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The issue coincides with the 2008 Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD), being held at McCormick Place, Chicago, July 26 to 31, 2008. Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., of the Massachusetts General Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease and Massachusetts General Hospital, is a Guest Editor. "In this issue of Neurotherapeutics, we have enlisted several experts in the field to review the most promising new therapeutics currently under development for the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's Disease," Dr. Tanzi writes in the introductory editorial.

The eleven papers in the special issue highlight promising therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease, providing an update on efforts to develop treatments. Given the central role of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, cerebral accumulations of Aβ are a major focus. The lead article in the issue looks at techniques for measuring the effects of disease-modifying therapies on cerebral Aβ levels - including the key question of whether they correlate with cognitive performance.

Clinical trials aimed at all of these therapeutic targets are underway. In his editorial, Dr. Tanzi expresses "cautious optimism and high hopes" that these trials may lead to new therapeutic approaches to Alzheimer's disease. He concludes, "With several active clinical trials and other promising drugs now headed toward the clinic, the hope is that we will soon have novel Alzheimer's Disease therapeutics that successfully slow or reverse disease progress in Alzheimer's Disease.

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