Prevent Heart Disease with 1 Statin Alternative Your Doctor May Not be Recommending

Preventing heart disease
Advertisement

Statins are estimated to prevent thousands of deaths a year from heart disease and stroke, but for many it comes at a price that outweighs the potential benefit—a risk of side effects that include muscle damage and a risk of developing diabetes. While some alternative statin medications are available, according to Dr. Oz, you can prevent heart disease naturally with a healthy statin alternative that research is showing is better for your overall health than the pill millions of Americans take daily.

“An overwhelming 35 million of you are currently on statins and an astounding 70 million are recommended a statin. Today, I am here to challenge those numbers. A breaking new study claims that even just one healthy food choice a day can prevent almost as many deaths from heart disease as statins―without all the nasty side effects. Today, the foods that can even be more powerful than statins,” promises Dr. Oz as he tells viewers about the 1 statin alternative your doctor may not be telling you about.

“My goal is to prevent you from ever needing a statin; or, if you are on a statin, to help you over time not need them anymore,” says Dr. Oz as he points out that one complaint he has about statins is that they only target one aspect of heart disease—lowering cholesterol—but have very little impact on the high blood pressure and high blood sugar that also contribute to heart disease.

In fact, some health experts question whether traditional cholesterol tests that are prescribed by doctors are even relevant to our health and wellbeing.

“Today, the heart foods you need in your diet that not only work like statins to lower your cholesterol, but also target the other risk factors that cause heart attacks,” says Dr. Oz with his list of recommended heart healthy foods you need to take today and every day.

Statin Alternative #1: An Apple a Day Keeps the Heart Surgeon Away

Dr. explains to viewers that the new breaking study he referred to earlier found that after crunching the numbers in comparing the mortality effects between taking a statin and eating an apple a day, that both were nearly equal in preventing death from heart disease.

The reason for the power behind the apple Dr. Oz tells viewers is that cholesterol is continually produced by the liver and becomes part of the bile that is released to aid digestion and the uptake of nutrients by the intestine. However, the cholesterol in bile is reabsorbed by the intestines and shuttled back to the blood and then eventually back to the liver where it repeats its cycle—almost endlessly. However, researchers believe that by eating an apple a day that endless cholesterol recycling is broken by phytochemicals and fiber found in apples that causes the cholesterol in bile to be eliminated from the body rather than resorbed by the intestines.

“Your cholesterol gets lowered from all of those apples, because the apples allow the body to excrete the bile and the cholesterol outside because it’s got all of that fiber in there,” says Dr. Oz. “And, it has an added benefit…it turns out that there are things in apples that are natural blood regulators of sugar—it’s called ‘peptin’. So, in order to reduce your blood sugar and to keep your cholesterol low, my prescription is one heart apple a day…it keeps the heart surgeon like me away.”

Statin Alternative #2: Beet Greens for Blood Pressure

Beets themselves have been promoted for their systolic and diastolic blood pressure lowering properties. But according to Dr. Oz, the greens from beets are useful too.

“They [beet greens] are often thrown away, but they are a wonderful source of insoluble fiber―the kind of fiber that’s important for getting cholesterol out of your bloodstream. But beet greens have a special extra benefit—they have a lot of potassium in them,” says Dr. Oz.

Dr. Oz explains that why the potassium from beet greens is so beneficial is that it helps lower the amount of sodium in your blood, which in turns lowers your blood pressure and helps you eliminate one of the risk factors of heart disease not covered by taking a statin.

Advertisement

His recommendation is to eat 1 cup of beet greens a day through any number of recipes, but recommends sautéing as one example of a quick and easy way to add beet greens to your diet to lower your blood pressure.

Statin Alternative #3: Knock Out Cholesterol with Garlic Breath

While processing cholesterol is a normal biochemical process in the human body, for some people,their body has higher levels of cholesterol than others due to their genetics rather than the foods they eat.

“Some of us have really hyperactive workers that are making a ton of cholesterol, which is why our genetics predisposes us to this. But, if you take garlic in the right amount you actually knock off those workers and you actually knock off the cholesterol for that reason. Because if you don’t have workers working in the pipeline to produce that cholesterol, you are not going to have any in your blood…it actually almost works like a medicine,” says Dr. Oz.

In fact, garlic has been shown to be an effective antibiotic for fighting drug-resistant bacteria in the body as well.

Dr. Oz’s recommendation for integrating garlic in your diet is to either take 1 teaspoon of garlic powder that you can sprinkle over your meal or eat 1 glove of fresh garlic per day.

Dr. Oz ends the show with his advice that he believes that there is a lot of truth to the old adage of eating an apple a day to keep the doctor away and advises viewers to turn to healthy foods for healthy living to avoid medications when possible.

“…start popping the foods we’ve been talking about today and you will most likely avoid popping the pills later on,” says Dr. Oz.

Click-on here for or an informative article about how eating apples can be bad for your health.

Image Source: Courtesy of PhotoBucket

References:

The Dr. Oz Show

BMJ study on apples versus statins: “A statin a day keeps the doctor away: comparative proverb assessment modelling study” BMJ 347: f7267, Published 17 December 2013.

Advertisement