Low-Carb Diet with This One Surprising Ingredient Increases Weight Loss by 10%

Cocoa

Low-carb dieting does work for weight loss. But did you know that for most low-carb dieters that their weight yo-yos back and forth after the first few weeks? Here’s news about a recent study where researchers found that by adding one surprising ingredient to a low-carb diet prevents this yo-yo effect and actually increases weight loss by 10%.

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According to a recent study published in the journal International Archives of Medicine: Endocrinology, researchers have noted with interest that chocolate may have benefits that include supporting weight loss efforts. In a past study with mice, the researchers remarked about one earlier study that found that when mice were fed long-term a high-fat diet, that their overall weight remained remarkably low.

To see if similar results could be achieved with human test subjects, researchers from the Institute of Diet and Health devised a study lasting several weeks that consisted of men and women between the ages of 19-64 with BMI values that ranged from normal to obese who were divided into three specific diet groups.

Chocolate Study Design

One group followed a low-carb diet, but were directed not to eat any chocolate. A second group also followed a low-carb diet, but were instructed to eat 42 grams of dark chocolate consisting of an 81% cocoa content. The third group was allowed to eat at their own discretion with no restrictions on what they ate day-to-day.

All study participants gave blood samples for analysis before and after the study as well as had their weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist-to-hip ratios measured and compared. The participants received urine test strips for daily use during the study period so that multiple physiological factors could be assessed throughout the study such as changes in lipid levels, protein in the blood, cholesterol, triglycerides and blood ketone levels. The participants also recorded their nightly sleep quality and overall mental health during the study period.

Results of the Study

After the study ended and the data analyzed, what the researchers found was that chocolate actually appears to act as a type of “weight loss accelerant” while on a low-carb diet. The results include:

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• Subjects of the chocolate intervention group experienced the easiest and most successful weight loss beating out the low-carb, no-chocolate group with 10% more weight lost.

• The weight lost by the low-carb, plus-chocolate diet began to exceed the low-carb, no-chocolate group by week 3 of the study period.

• While the low carb, no-chocolate group began to experience weight yo-yo’ing after a few weeks on the diet, the low-carb, plus-chocolate group experienced a steady increase in weight loss.

• The low-carb, plus-chocolate group had improved levels of physiological biomarkers over those of the low-carb, no-chocolate group.

• The low-carb, plus-chocolate group experienced a statistically significant improvement in their well-being (physically and mentally) compared to the results of the low-carb, no-chocolate group.

The researchers of the study concluded that:

“Consumption of chocolate with a high cocoa content can significantly increase the success of weight-loss diets. The weight-loss effect of this diet occurs with a certain delay. Long-term weight loss, however, seems to occur easier and more successfully by adding chocolate. The effect of the chocolate, the so-called ‘weight loss turbo,’ seems to go hand in hand with personal well-being, which was significantly higher than in the control groups.”

For more about chocolate and its association with weight loss, here is an informative article about losing weight with sex and other myths; plus, the way to lose weight by eating carbs the right way according to a Chris Powell―trainer and transformation specialist on ABC’s “Extreme Makeover.”

Reference: “Chocolate with high Cocoa content as a weight-loss accelerator” International Archives of Medicine Vol. 8, No. 55, 2015 ;Johannes Bohannon, Diana Koch, Peter Homm, Alexander Driehaus.

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