Even If the Female Viagra Drug Addyi Does Not Work, It’s Still a Good Thing

Female Viagra Drug Addyi

This October, women who suffer from Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) will at long last have a pharmaceutical drug to treat their condition. However, critics argue that the so-called “Female Viagra” drug called “Addyi” doesn’t really work. Here’s why if the critics are correct, that this is still a good thing.

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The FDA recently announced its decision to approve a drug sold under the brand name Addyi - known generically as flibanserin - to help treat women who suffer from a lack of desire to have sex.

"Today's approval provides women distressed by their low sexual desire with an approved treatment option," said Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Unlike its male counterpart, rather than having an effect on the genitals, the drug is designed to go to the 2nd largest sex organ of the human body—the brain (skin technically counts as the largest sex organ).

Unlike Viagra, which affects blood flow to the genitals, Addyi is designed to act upon the chemical neurotransmitters in the brain that are involved in sexual stimulation—similar in class to another type of brain-modulating drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) that include antidepressants like Prozac. The end-goal of taking Addyi on a daily basis is that it will eventually change a woman’s sexual mood to where she will feel more inclined to take the initiative rather than avoid sex.

The main criticism some health experts have made of Addyi is that it still does not merit approval because the benefits do not outweigh the risks. Taking Addyi puts a woman at risk of low blood pressure, dizziness and loss of consciousness—especially while drinking alcohol Remember, Addyi is taken daily, so that means drinking presumably is not allowed. The benefits according to clinical trials appear meager at best with a reported increase of only one additional sex act per month while on the drug. Still, that one extra event with a loved one could make all the difference in the world for some.

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And, as pointed out by Dr. Lauren Streicher of Northwestern University as quoted by NBC News, just having something to offer women is a big deal:

"As a sexual health expert, as a gynecologist, as someone who takes care of women every single day ... this is going to be a game changer for me because right now I have women that come into my office and have these issues and I just say, 'I'm so sorry. There is nothing that I can do,'” says Dr. Streicher.

But what could be more important to women than the effectiveness of taking Addyi for treating HSDD is the fact that Big Pharma may take a renewed interest in resuming research that could lead to more-effective medications for women in the future. Previous research by the larger companies was abandoned when it was found that not only is development costly for finding a “female Viagra” equivalent, but difficult as well toward getting approval from the FDA. Today, it’s a different story.

"This is a huge advancement in women's health because for the first time we have an FDA approved, non-hormonal option for women who have this very distressing lack of sexual desire," stated Dr. Streicher.

For more about sexual dysfunction in women, here is an informative article on how accidental orgasms offer new hope for many women.

Reference: NBC NewsFDA Approves Flibanserin, 'Female Viagra' Pill

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Comments

I for one am dismayed that this drug has been approved. The risks outweigh the benefits.It seems to me that offering women this drug is just one more way for Big Pharma to profit from what has been a void in the treatment arena. Rather than doctors like Dr. Lauren Streicher of Northwestern University cheering the introduction of this new drug, they should be up in arms and warning their patients not to use it. I'm not saying HSDD should not be treated, but it should be treated responsibly. Women will be guinea pigs for perhaps years while Big Pharma pats itself on the back for introducing a drug for women who may be desperate.
Here's the thing - and I too am dismayed - no one even knows what causes HSDD for any particular woman. The female psyche is complex. The reasons behind the condition are multi-faceted. So, to even suggest a drug - when indeed another drug could be causing the problem in the first place - is ludicrous. Beware. I hope the drug fails miserably.