E-Cigarette Warning to Parents as Child’s Death Attributed to Liquid Nicotine

E-cigarette warning

In light of what is believed to be the first reported death of a child by nicotine poisoning, health authorities are stating in related news that E-Cigarettes should be treated like real cigarettes because of the inherent dangers they pose.

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Previously, Dr. Oz has warned the public about the inherent dangers of E-cigarettes and flavored liquid nicotine.

“There is nothing safe about nicotine in any form. And that includes liquid nicotine―which is what is inside an e-cigarette,” says Dr. Oz who tells viewers that even one small teaspoon of this addictive drug referred to as “E-juice” or “Vape-juice” could be lethal.

However, more recently in a recent ABC News report, that lethality can extend to much younger non-smokers as a one-year-old child was found dead at home due to toxic exposure from ingesting liquid nicotine.

Although it is unreported as to whether the source of nicotine was directly associated with E-cigarette use in the home, accidental exposure and poisoning from nicotine is on the rise. The American Association of Poison Control Centers announced recently that as of November 30th, there were 3,638 reported incidences of dangerous exposures to liquid nicotine through ingestion, inhalation or by absorption through the skin.

In homes with small children, E-cigarettes are especially a potential health hazard due to their packaging as colorful liquids that come in a wide range of enticing scents and flavors such as gummy bear and cotton candy.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Center in a recent statement about the dangers of E-cigarettes in the home:

"One teaspoon of liquid nicotine could be lethal to a child, and smaller amounts can cause severe illness, often requiring trips to the emergency department. Despite the dangers these products pose to children, there are currently no standards set in place that require child-proof packaging.”

However, that lack of standards may end soon as ABC News reports in a news video below that regulators are finally stepping in and saying that E-Cigarettes should be treated like real cigarettes:


More ABC US news | ABC World News

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Interest in government regulation of the E-cigarette industry is based on growing evidence that E-cigarettes may be more harmful than advertised by its makers, and due to that manufacturers of the product are resorting to the same tactics as the tobacco industry in attempting to entice new consumers.

Regulation is needed in particular not only to curtail undue temptation and access by the under-aged, but to also decrease the potential for accidental poisoning at home. Currently, depending on the manufacturer of a particular brand of liquid nicotine used for E-cigarettes, the dosage of nicotine can range from extremely small to highly concentrated.

Proposed Regulation for E-cigarettes includes:

• Banning sales of E-cigarettes to minors

• Requiring warning labels on the packaging

• Requiring FDA approval of all E-cigarette-related products

And while supporters of E-cigarettes contend that E-cigarettes differ from tobacco cigarettes by being smoking-cessation devices, research shows that the reality of the industry is that E-cigarette marketers are targeting youths to get them hooked on their product.

Furthermore, those claims that E-cigarettes qualify as effective smoking cessation devices may be more anecdotal than actual according to results of a study that pitted electronic cigarettes against nicotine patches—and may not be so safe as marketers would have you believe according to a study by Consumer Reports on the 5 Most Common E-Cigarette Problems.

For more about the hazards of smoking and help on smoking cessation that works, here is a collection of related articles to help you get the information you need for healthier living.

Image Source: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Reference: ABC News― “First Child's Death from Liquid Nicotine Reported as 'Vaping' Gains Popularity

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