3 New Ways to Take Aspirin Recommended by Dr. Oz

Uses of Aspirint
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When most people take an aspirin they typically pop a small white tablet or two into their mouth followed by a glass of water to wash it down while swallowing the pills whole. However, according to Dr. Oz, there are better ways to take aspirin depending on the reason why you are taking an aspirin and for what condition. Read on to discover 3 new ways recommended by Dr. Oz for taking an aspirin the next time you have body pain, a headache or discover that you are on the verge of having a heart attack.

Aspirin is undoubtedly the most-used medicine in the world. Its effectiveness is due to a compound called “salicylic acid” that was once derived from willow bark that works to stop pain by interfering with your cells’ ability to make prostaglandins―chemicals involved in the pain sensation process.

Salicylic acid comes from the Salicylate family of drugs that reduces the effects of inflammation such as pain, swelling, redness and heat. The word salicylate refers to the active ingredient in this family of drugs as seen in chemical name of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA) or other aspirin-like medications known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs for short.

While aspirin is typically used to treat minor aches and pains, newer research has proposed that aspirin may slow down the aging process in women and that it may help in the fight against obesity due to a recent study that shows that aspirin causes fat to burn in obese mice.

In a recent episode of The Dr. Oz Show, Dr. Oz tells viewers that aspirin is his favorite medicine and reveals that the way you take aspirin should differ depending on why you are taking aspirin. The following is Dr. Oz’s 3 recommended ways to take aspirin and for which conditions:

Chew Your Aspirin―For heart attacks or angina, Dr. Oz recommends that when you take that life-saving aspirin you should do so by popping it into your mouth as soon as you feel the warning signs of an impending heart attack such as pain in your left shoulder, shortness of breath, etc. and then chew it to help it dissolve quickly in your mouth.

His recommendation was highlighted in a 2009 study finding, showing aspirin is absorbed more quickly when it's chewed.

“The key is that you have to chew it fast; doing it quickly will make the difference between life and death,” says Dr. Oz who recommends taking either one 325 mg pill of aspirin or 4 low-dose aspirins within the first 5 minutes upon experiencing symptoms of a heart attack.

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Dr. Oz explains that for heart attacks that aspirin is effective in preventing blood clots from completely forming within blocked arteries that manifests as chest pain due to a decrease in oxygenated blood getting to the heart muscle. The benefit of aspirin is that the salicylic acid in the aspirin will “thin your blood” temporarily and buy you precious time to get to a hospital quickly.

This blood thinning benefit of aspirin has also recently been recommended for women who suffer from blood clots that form in their legs in a condition called venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Spread Your Aspirin―For body aches and pain in muscles that have been pulled or stretched too much during exercise or some other physical activity, Dr. Oz recommends spreading your aspirin over the affected muscles with a topical aspirin cream. The advantage to this over swallowing a pill is that the active component of aspirin can go directly to the pain without having to pass through the digestive system where it may add stomach pain to your problems.

Drink Your Aspirin―For treating headaches, Dr. Oz says the best way to take aspirin is as a drink.

“My new way to take aspirin for headaches is to drink your aspirin. When you drink your aspirin, it’s a direct shot into your bloodstream, which gets into your brain faster and provides immediate relief,” says Dr. Oz.

His recommendation is to have on hand for headache emergencies a supply of the effervescent form of aspirin sold in drug stores that dissolves fast in water just like an Alka seltzer tablet does with a cloudy burst of pain-relieving bubbles.

However, if you have an allergy to aspirin, there is a new form of aspirin alternative that may work for you just as well as regular aspirin.

Image Source: Courtesy of PhotoBucket

Reference: The Dr. Oz Show

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