Multiple Sclerosis Progression Linked To Immune-Cell Substance

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Multiple Sclerosis

A new study suggests that a substance made by immune cells plays a key role in the progression of a disease in animals that closely mimics multiple sclerosis (MS). The findings further suggest that blocking the molecule, known as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) might prevent the progression of the disease.

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Researchers at The Ohio State University Medical Center conducted the study using mice that develop a disease that mimics MS. They compared these animals to similar mice that lacked MIF, an immune-system signaling molecule.

The results show that the animals without MIF develop the initial, acute phase of the disease, but then show no signs of further progression. The study is published as a Cutting Edge paper in the November 1, 2005, issue of the Journal of Immunology.

"Our results suggest that MIF may be less important for initiating Multiple Sclerosis, but that it may be necessary for

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