Srudy Examines Antioxidants, Memory Concerns

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Rush University Medical Center is conducting a clinical trial to evaluate whether taking Cerefolin NAC reduces the inflammation and oxidative stress that is associated with memory decline in older persons. Cerefolin NAC is a commercially available food supplement available by prescription. It is a combination of high dose vitamin B12, B6, and folic acid along with n-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant.

Researchers will evaluate whether taking Cerefolin NAC causes a greater reduction in homocysteine, oxidative stress, and inflammation blood marker levels than a standard multivitamin. Homocysteine is an amino acid associated with inflammation.

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"Finding treatments with the ability to reduce inflammation responses in the brain may help delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease," Said Dr. Raj Shah, medical director of the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center. "The results of this study will help determine how to design future studies to see if Cerefolin NAC can make a difference in maintaining memory."

Rush University Medical Center will be the only site conducting this study. The study seeks 100 participants over age 60 with memory concerns who have a slightly higher risk for having an elevated homocysteine level. Participants must not have a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer's disease, or a dementia.

One-half of participants will receive Cerefolin NAC and one-half will receive a placebo. All participants will receive a multivitamin. During the six month double-blind clinical trial, investigators will measure blood markers, will assess memory, walking, mood, and functional abilities, and will monitor side-effects over the course of four study visits with the participant.

"Alzheimer's disease is a public health crisis now and in the future. Alzheimer's disease currently affects over 4.5 million persons in the United States and over 200,000 in Illinois alone," said Shah. "It is projected to affect over 13 million persons by 2050 if nothing can be found to prevent the symptoms of the disease."

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