Reproductive Success In Early Life Leads To Faster Aging

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Aging and Reproduction

Why do we stop reproducing after a certain age, and how is this age determined? A study by Oxford University researchers has shed light on this question by studying data from Dorset swans.

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A theory which says that reproductive success in early life will lead to faster aging later has been supported by the study of mute swans (Cygnus olor) which shows that those swans which reproduce early in life also stopped breeding early, and vice versa. Which pattern a swan adopts appears to be genetically inherited.

The team, from the Edward Grey Institute in Oxford's Department of Zoology, investigated data on swans that bred as youngsters and those that started to reproduce at a much later age. They discovered the age at which swans started to reproduce varied considerably

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