Protect Your Family from Food Borne Illnesses

Armen Hareyan's picture
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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers not to eat certain jars of Peter Pan peanut butter or Great Value peanut butter due to risk of contamination with Salmonella Tennessee (a bacterium that causes foodborne illness). The affected jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter have a product code located on the lid of the jar that begins with the number "2111." If consumers have any of this Peter Pan or Great Value brand peanut butter in their home that has been purchased since May 2006, they should discard it.

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''The issue of food safety affects each and every person," said Zachary Thompson, DCHHS Director. "Dallas County Health and Human Services supports efforts in Congress to address the issue of food safety in the new legislative session. But we must take it a step further. We encourage corporations and food suppliers to take a close look at their quality control measures at all levels to ensure the safety the nation's food supply. We also urge residents to conduct due diligence in their selection, preparation and serving of food to their families," Thompson concluded. Symptoms of food borne illness caused by Salmonella include fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. In persons with poor underlying health or weakened immune systems, Salmonella can invade the bloodstream and cause lifethreatening infections. Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) is recommending that individuals who have recently eaten Peter Pan and Great Value brand peanut butter and are experiencing the symptoms shown above should contact their doctor or health care provider immediately and have their physician notify DCHHS. Consumers may phone the FDA at 1888INFOFDA.

According to the Centers Disease Control and Prevention, more than 76 million people each year suffer from food borne illnesses that occur when they eat food that contains bacteria or a toxin produced by bacteria growing in the food. Food items left at room temperature for long periods of time often fall prey to bacteria.
Given sufficient time, bacteria in food can grow and multiply depending on the type of food, the temperature at which it was held, its moisture content and its acidity level.

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