Removing Ovaries Before Menopause Leads To Memory And Movement Problems

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Women who have their ovaries removed before menopause are at an increased risk of developing memory problems or dementia and movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

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The study on dementia involved approximately 1,500 women who underwent the removal of one or both ovaries for non-cancer-related reasons, such as ovarian cysts, endometriosis, or for the prevention of ovarian cancer. The women were compared to an equal number of women who still had both ovaries at the beginning of the study. All participants were followed for a median of 27 years and were interviewed about their memory. If the women could not be interviewed directly, the investigators interviewed a family member. Researchers found that women who had one or both ovaries removed before menopause were nearly two times more likely to develop cognitive problems or dementia compared to women who did not have the surgery. In addition, those women who were younger when their ovaries were removed were more likely to develop dementia than women who were older when their ovaries were removed.

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