Brain Activity Related to Processing Faces is Similar in People With, Without Autism

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Autism and Brain

New Findings May Help with Social Interaction

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New brain imaging research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill indicates that when people with autism look at a face, activity in the brain area that responds is similar to that of people without autism.

The finding is surprising, as it is widely known that autistic individuals tend to avoid looking directly at faces. The research also counters previous published reports that the face-processing area at the back of the brain is under-responsive in people with autism and it suggests that specific behavioral interventions may help people with autism improve their ability to interact socially.

The new research

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