Echo Announces Positive Results With Prelude SkinPrep System

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Echo Therapeutics announced positive results from its human feasibility study of the Prelude SkinPrep System, Echo's next-generation, needle-free, non-invasive skin permeation medium for its Symphony tCGM System, a novel transdermal continuous glucose monitoring (tCGM) system in development for diabetes home use and hospital critical care markets. Prelude incorporates Echo's patented skin permeation control feedback technology into a comfortable, wireless, hand-held device used to prepare a small area of the skin for the non-invasive, biosensor and monitoring components of its Symphony tCGM system.

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Results of the feasibility study on healthy subjects demonstrate that Prelude safely and effectively permeated the skin so that the Symphony tCGM System could continuously monitor blood glucose levels reliably over a 24-hour period. Echo plans to use Prelude in the remaining pilot and pivotal clinical studies necessary to commercialize the Symphony tCGM System, including clinical studies scheduled to begin in the second quarter of this year.

"Painless, needle-free, non-invasive skin permeation is critical to our development and commercial goals for Symphony. Building on the positive results from our recently completed Symphony tCGM System study at Tufts Medical Center, we are pleased to have achieved technical feasibility of Prelude in humans well ahead of schedule," said Patrick Mooney, M.D., Echo's Chairman and CEO. "With Prelude, we now have a needle-free, safe, effective, easy-to-use and low-cost skin permeation system for Symphony. We look forward to the results of our near term clinical trials in the diabetes home use and hospital critical care settings."

"These data demonstrate that Prelude, which incorporates our patented feedback control mechanism, can achieve precise, individually optimized skin permeation to enable Symphony to provide users with reliable and continuous blood glucose information," said Han Chuang, Ph.D., Director of Research and Development at Echo Therapeutics. "We are very encouraged by our progress."

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