Can Alternative Care Be Both Medically And Cost Effective?

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Two disparate health studies have one thing in common: they aim to evaluate the effect of combining conventional and alternative care on health quality and cost. In the first study, researchers evaluated the use of an integrative medicine approach (treating the person as a whole rather than a specific disease) in an Eating Disorders Program. The study focused on insomnia and constipation (two large problems in this population) and found that as compared to the previous program, the integrative medicine program reduced the need for sleep medications from 55 percent to 11 percent. The second study, getting underway in Los Angeles, will, over the next 18 months, offer acupuncture services to a large sample of acute care patients facing a number of diagnoses. Studies have found that acupuncture can be cost effective.

Study 1: An Integrative Approach to Treating Eating Disorders

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