Anti-Smoking Chantinx Is Banned, Now What?

Armen Hareyan's picture
Advertisement

Anti-smoking drug Chantix is banned, but other drug makers who make drugs to helping to quit smoking use the opportunity to push their medications that help smokers to stop smoking. GlaxoSmithKline release says nicotine replacement therapy is safe, effective and can help reverse mental acuity deficits in smokers who are quitting, including commercial and private pilots.

Yesterday, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced it removed a prescription smoking cessation drug from the list of medications it considers safe for pilots and air-traffic controllers. This followed a new analysis of adverse event data from the non-profit Institute for Safe Medication Practices which linked the medication to mental confusion and other problems that could put passengers at risk.

This news is going to have a dramatic impact on pilots and air-traffic controllers who smoke.

Advertisement

Rerecent research, which shows that the 4mg nicotine lozenge has been clinically proven to help reverse the following symptoms associated with quitting smoking: difficulty concentrating, attention deficit, short-term memory deficit and selective attention deficit - some of the very issues at the heart of today's story.

This information is in addition to the extensive studies that have shown nicotine replacement therapy reduces nicotine withdrawal symptoms, including difficulty concentrating.

In 1994, the FAA requested the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) assemble an expert panel to examine the effects of smoking and tobacco addiction and withdrawal on pilot performance and airline safety. As part of the panel's conclusion, they found NRT to be safe, effective treatment option for pilots who smoke.1 Those recommendations stand to this day.

"Nicotine withdrawal is a serious issue for pilots who are in the process of quitting smoking, and

Advertisement