Researchers Uncover New Mechanism of Tumor Suppressor

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Cancer treatments with fewer side effects

Researchers from the University of Colorado-Denver and Health Sciences Center and Stanford University have discovered a molecular mechanism that explains how cells respond to DNA damage and other acute stresses, and if disrupted can cause cancer. Their findings, which could lead to new diagnostic markers and cancer treatments with fewer side effects, will appear in two reports in the May 21 advanced online version of the journal Nature.

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The studies, led by Tatiana Kutateladze, PhD, an assistant professor in the UCDHSC Department of Pharmacology, and Or Gozani, MD, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University, revealed the significance of a novel function of the recently discovered tumor-suppressive molecule, which is thought to inhibit cancer formation and growth. These findings highlight a new mechanism to regulate gene expression programs that allow for appropriate responses to DNA damage in normal cells. When the process breaks down, such damage and other acute stresses are thought to lead to cancer.

The first study, Molecular mechanism of histone H3K4me3 recognition by plant homeodomain of ING2, was conducted in Kutateladze's laboratory with the assistance of graduate student Pedro Pe

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