New Hopeful Treatment For Beating Aggressive Cancers

Armen Hareyan's picture
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With an 89% initial success rate in arresting or eradicating some of the most aggressive cancers, a Nashville-based treatment is being offered to the public for the first time. According to NeoPlas Innovation Director of Research Dr. Stephen Cantrell, gathering more data to validate effectiveness is imperative, but "early human results are quite exciting. This treatment has been effective for malignant melanoma, as well as pancreatic and some of the other worst-prognosis cancers."

The new protocol incorporates a unique combination of FDA-approved drugs already known to be safe, each used by millions of people for other applications. When administered alone, these drugs show some benefit against cancer, but not enough to make a difference for most patients. The combination of the medicines, however, allows lower, more tolerable dosages and provides effectiveness not seen in previous single-drug studies.

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The NeoPlas treatment shows benefit in several aggressive malignancies because it disables certain abnormal cellular processes many of them share. Based on experience and relevant lab research to date, staff members expect the best results for melanoma, pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, renal (kidney) cancer, mesothelioma, and a group of sarcomas, including osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Patients who have other cancers can be considered on a case-by-case basis, since many of them may benefit also. Having received previous cancer treatments does not make a patient ineligible.

The regimen's most notable side-effect is fatigue. Most patients never experience nausea, vomiting, hair loss, bone marrow or immune system suppression, or other side-effects commonly affiliated with chemotherapy or radiation. An experienced physician prescribes and monitors all treatment and maintains close communication with the patient's established oncologist.

NeoPlas Innovation serves patients living throughout the country. Since treatment takes place on an outpatient basis, most patients travel to Nashville about once every two months. Additionally, physicians usually can tell if the program is working within eight weeks and quickly enable patients to make their best healthcare decisions.

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