EntreMed Commences Study With MKC-1 In Pancreatic Cancer

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Pancreatic Cancer

EntreMed has commenced a multi-center Phase 2 clinical trial with MKC-1 in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

The primary objectives of this study will be to determine the antitumor activity of orally-administered MKC-1 in unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer patients who have failed at least one prior chemotherapy regimen. The study will also assess the safety, tolerability and overall median survival time of pancreatic cancer patients treated with MKC-1. Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center is the lead institution for the study and Eunice Kwak, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant in Medicine, Tucker Gosnell Center for Gastrointestinal Cancers, will serve as the principal investigator.

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MKC-1 is a novel, orally-active cell cycle inhibitor with in vitro and in vivo efficacy against a broad range of human solid tumor cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cell lines. Prior preclinical studies have demonstrated that MKC-1 has significant antitumor activity as both a single agent and in combination with an approved epidermal growth factor/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF/EGFR) inhibitor in pancreatic cancer models.

MKC-1 has also demonstrated broad-acting antitumor effects, including tumor growth inhibition or regression, in multiple preclinical models. MKC-1 has been shown to inhibit mitotic spindle formation, prevent chromosome segregation in the M-phase (mitosis) of the cell cycle, and induce apoptosis.

About Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic cancer is the abnormal cell growth in the tissue of the pancreas. The pancreas is an organ about six inches in length which is located behind the stomach, next to the small intestine. The pancreas produces enzymes that aide in the digestion and absorption of food. Unless pancreatic cancer is detected early, it is difficult to control. At the present time, there is no effective screening for pancreatic cancer and, because the pancreas is hidden by other organs, it is difficult to diagnosis.

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that approximately 37,000 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas in 2007, resulting in approximately 33,000 deaths.

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