Immigrant Children Are At Risk Of Lead Poisoning

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Immigrant children are five times as likely as U.S-born children to suffer from lead poisoning in New York City, according to a new Health Department study, and the risk is highest among the most recent immigrants. The new study of children tested for lead poisoning in 2002, published online in the American Journal of Public Health this month, found that children who had lived abroad within the previous six months were 11 times as likely as U.S.-born children to have lead poisoning. The most affected children were from the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico and Pakistan -- nations where lead may be less tightly regulated than in the United States.

Lead-based paint is the primary cause of lead poisoning for both U.S. and foreign-born children in New York City, but immigrant children may face additional lead threats in their home countries. Of the 800 lead poisoned children requiring home investigations in 2006, Health Department staff identified lead paint hazards in 80% of U.S. born cases but only 65% of foreign born cases. While it is not possible to document the exact sources of lead exposure for these immigrant children, other research has shown that pollution, foods, herbal medicines, dishes, toys, jewelry, and cosmetics are sources of lead in foreign countries.

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"This study suggests that immigrant children are being exposed to lead in their home countries before they arrive in New York City," said Jessica Leighton, Deputy Commissioner of Environmental Health and co-author of the study. "And some immigrant families may be bringing tainted products with them to New York City. We encourage all parents, especially parents who are recent immigrants, to be sure their children are tested for lead poisoning at ages one and two, as required by law."

Dr. Leighton also urged health care providers to consider blood-lead testing when caring for foreign-born children of all ages. The Health Department's most current statistics show that while only 14% of the city's children were born outside the United States, 18% of lead poisoned children with lead levels requiring home investigation were foreign-born.

What parents can do to Protect their children from lead poisoning

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