Car Seat Saves Life Of Brunswick Child

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Car Seat Classes

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that restraining a child in car seat reduces its chances of being injured fatally by 71 percent for infants (less than one year old) and by 54 percent for toddlers (one to four years old) in passenger cars.

On February 13th, Brandie Sullivan and her two year old were driving home on Hwy 341 in Brunswick. As they waited to make a left turn into their neighborhood, a car approaching from the opposite direction veered from its lane and crashed head on into Sullivan and her two-year-old daughter. Though the car sustained considerable damage, its youngest passenger was unharmed. Her mom had recently attended a free class offered by the Glynn County Health Department, where she was given a car seat and taught how to appropriately use it and install it in her vehicle. The health department also provided Sullivan with a replacement car seat after the crash.

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"The Glynn County Health Department is representative of the tireless efforts of hundreds of health professionals and volunteers to educate and train parents/caregivers throughout the state," said Stuart Brown, M.D., director of the Division of Public Health. Last year over 6,000 Georgia residents were educated and 3,700 low-income children received seats to help transport them safely on Georgia roads. "Though not all fatalities are preventable," said Dr. Brown, "the data indicate that properly restraining a child is extremely effective in reducing their chance of being fatally injured."

Motor vehicle-related incidents are the leading cause of death for children over the age of one in the U.S. and Georgia. The number of fatalities is greatly reduced by using a car seat. Studies conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that restraining a child reduces its chances of being injured fatally by 71 percent for infants (less than one year old) and by 54 percent for toddlers (one to four years old) in passenger cars.

"In an effort to combat preventable death and injury of children on Georgia's highways, the Governor's Office of Highway Safety (GOHS) in partnership with DHR's Injury Prevention Section are working together to coordinate a child safety seat distribution and education program for many of Georgia's health departments," said Robert Dallas, Director, GOHS. Currently, over 80 Occupant Safety Programs throughout the state seek to ensure that Georgia's children are safe while riding in motor vehicles. The solution is making sure that parents and caregivers properly transport children in child safety seats every time they travel.

The greatest reward for DHR's health department staff who teach the car seat classes, and to our partners, who help make the classes possible, is knowing that a child is safe today because a mother received the knowledge she needed to help save her children from a tragic, almost fatal accident.

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