Syphilis Rate On Rise In U.S. Gay, Bisexual Men

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Syphilis in gay and bisexual men

Armed with more than a decade's worth of statistics, researchers are sounding a new alarm about growing rates of syphilis among gay and bisexual men.

The overall number of syphilis cases in the United States fell from 50,578 in 1990 to just 7,177 in 2003 perhaps because of a nationwide prevention campaign aimed at heterosexuals. Nevertheless, gay men have seen their rates rise significantly in this decade.

"The entire nation was caught unawares," said study lead author James Heffelfinger, M.D., a medical epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "You're concentrating on one population, but the next thing you know, you start seeing a large increase among another group."

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It is still easy to cure syphilis, but it can cause serious medical problems, including death if untreated. In addition, officials worry that gay men will get syphilis and become more susceptible to HIV infection, although statistics have not made it clear if that is actually happening.

The study authors looked at syphilis rates from 1990 to 2003 and reported the changes during that time. The American Journal of Public Health released the findings online this week, and they will also appear in the June print edition.

Between 1990 and 2000, syphilis rates fell by a whopping 90 percent, from a rate of 20.3 cases per 100,000 people to 2.1 cases per 100,000. Among other factors, public health officials think the rates dropped because fewer people were selling sex to get crack cocaine as the decade went by.

However, the syphilis rate rose by 19 percent between 2000 and 2003.

During that period, the rates among women continued to slide

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