Study Of Younger Postmenopausal Women Links Estrogen Therapy To Less Plaque In Arteries

Armen Hareyan's picture
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New study shows that younger postmenopausal women who take estrogen-alone hormone therapy have significantly less buildup of calcium plaque in their arteries compared to their peers who did not take hormone therapy.

Coronary artery calcium is considered a marker for future risk of coronary artery disease.

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Results of the WHI Coronary Artery Calcium Study are published in the June 21, 2007, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The WHI is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

"These new results offer some reassurance to younger women who have had a hysterectomy and who would like to use hormone therapy on a short-term basis to ease menopausal symptoms," noted Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D., NHLBI director. "We must emphasize, however, that these findings do not alter the current recommendations that when hormone therapy is used for menopausal symptoms, it should only be taken at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible, and hormone therapy should never be used to prevent heart disease."

The new findings are from an ancillary study of 1064 women who were 50-59 years of age at the start of the WHI hormone therapy clinical trial. Participants were randomly assigned to either 0.625 milligrams per day of conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin

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