Progression Of Disability At Two Years Predicts Multiple Sclerosis Disability Progression

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Multiple Sclerosis

A post-hoc analysis from a Phase III clinical trial of AVONEX (interferon beta-1a) and post-randomization eight-year follow up shows that six-month sustained progression of disability at two years, using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), is a significant predictor of long-term disability, as measured by EDSS milestones of 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0 at eight years, in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The analysis suggests that patients taking AVONEX for two years were less likely to experience disability progression over time (eight years) when compared to placebo. These data were announced today at the 23rd Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) conference in Prague, Czech Republic.

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The analysis involved 160 patients with RRMS who received at least two years of treatment (81 placebo, 79 interferon beta-1a), in the AVONEX Phase III trial and who were re-examined eight years post-randomization. 45 patients met the criteria for two-year disability progression sustained for six months (n=18 AVONEX, 27 placebo). The analysis revealed:

-- Patients initially treated with AVONEX were less likely than patients initially receiving placebo to progress to EDSS scores of greater than or equal to 4.0 at eight years

-- Six month sustained EDSS progression during the pivotal two-year trial was a significant predictor of disability progression eight years later

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