CEL-1000 Is A Successful Vaccine Adjuvant With Recombinant Hepatitis B Virus Protein

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Recombinant Hepatitis B Virus Protein

CEL-SCI Corporation's CEL-1000 immunomodulator was shown to be able to jump start the immune response against the recombinant hepatitis B virus protein more quickly than did other vaccine adjuvants. This effect in the mouse model was seen within 14 days, most pronounced with a single dose of CEL-1000 at day 0 and resulted in up to a 40% increase in antibody signal at day 28. Also, the timing of the CEL-1000 administration had significant impact on the type of immune response that was created, as well as its strength.

The significance of this data lies in the fact that CEL-1000 appears to be able to mount a faster immune response, something that is absolutely necessary for a bio defense or a pandemic flu setting, as well as the potential ability to create more effective immune responses through the use of CEL-1000 as an adjuvant. The data were presented by Dr. Daniel H. Zimmerman, Senior Vice President of Research, Cellular Immunology at CEL-SCI and involved a collaboration with scientists at several other institutions including Drs. Kenneth S. Rosenthal Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM), Rootstown, Ohio, Frank Klotz of Biocon, Rockville, Maryland, Peter Blackburn and Steve Grimes of Mercia-Pharma, New York. The data were presented at the 47rd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) in Chicago, Illinois.

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Dr. Zimmerman said, "These findings are important not just for our CEL-1000 adjuvant, but also for any adjuvant because our work has shown that the timing of the use of the adjuvant and how often it is given have significant influence on the type and strength of the immune responses elicited."

In challenge studies, CEL-1000 has also previously been shown to protect animals against infection against viruses and unrelated diseases, specifically herpes simplex virus, viral encephalitis and malaria.

CEL-1000 appears to activate innate (very early stage) and Th1 type (cellular) immune responses to induce a broad-spectrum protection against infection in animal models. The innate immune system is generally accepted to be the first line of defense against infectious agents.

CEL-1000, derived from the beta chain of human MHC-II, is a modified version of a human immune-based protein known to bind to both human and mouse immune cells and appears to act by enhancing the host's protective immune response.

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