Cytokine Demonstrates Oral Efficacy Of Small-Molecule MIF Inhibitors

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Small-Molecule MIF Inhibitors

Cytokine PharmaSciences revealed that recent experiments with its small-molecule MIF inhibitors showed oral efficacy in animal models.

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Based on these results, the Company announced that it is advancing one of these compounds into preclinical development.

Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor, or MIF, is linked to many conditions, including arthritis, asthma, cancer, sepsis, inflammatory bowel disease and various infections and autoimmune disorders. Neutralization of MIF biological activity has been shown to have a protective effect against these diseases. CPSI has an extensive patent portfolio focused on MIF, covering various methods for neutralization, including small molecules. These compounds were recently shown to be effective in animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and arthritis when administered orally.

The MS animal experiments were conducted in the laboratories of Dr. Abhay Satoskar and Dr. Caroline C. Whitacre, both of Ohio State University in Columbus, OH. Dr. Satoskar stated: "The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was impressive with no outward signs of toxicity. These findings indicate that small-molecule MIF inhibitors are viable drug candidates for treating other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in which MIF has been identified as a pathogenic factor." Dr. Whitacre adds: "The inhibitors were especially effective in treating disease that had already started, which is traditionally the most difficult hurdle for a new therapy. We are very encouraged by these results."

The arthritis experiments were conducted under the guidance of Drs. Thais M. Sielecki and Vidal F. de la Cruz of Cytokine PharmaSciences, Inc. Dr. Sielecki observed: "We are encouraged to have a small molecule MIF inhibitor that is orally active. MIF is an important target in many diseases and an oral treatment is a definite advantage." Dr. Sielecki will present the MS and arthritis results at the annual American Chemical Society conference on August 22, 2007, in Boston, MA.

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