Limitations Of Complex And Challenging Global Tuberculosis Drug Marketplace Unveiled

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Tuberculosis Drug Marketplace

The Global Alliance for TB Drug Development released results from the first comprehensive study of the dynamics of the global Tuberculosis drug market that offers a detailed analysis of how today's TB medicines reach patients around the world, and an estimate of the value of the global market for first-line TB treatments.

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The study, Pathway to Patients: Charting the Dynamics of the Global TB Drug Market, reveals the variability and complexities faced at all levels of the TB drug supply chain; the highly fragmented nature of the global marketplace in terms of purchase, supply and delivery; the important role of local and national governments in procurement and distribution; and the limited commercial market potential for new TB drugs.

"The absence of a viable commercial market has clearly held back TB drug research for decades," said Maria C. Freire, CEO and President of the TB Alliance. "This groundbreaking study reaffirms the mission of the TB Alliance to develop new, faster and better TB drugs, and the importance of working to ensure these lifesaving new cures reach all those who need them."

Pathway to Patients studied the TB drug market in ten strategically selected countries, including high burden, emerging and high income markets (Brazil, China, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Philippines, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States) to obtain country specific market data and provide a comprehensive understanding in eight key countries of procurement and distribution systems.

The study projects an estimate of the global market for first-line TB drugs of approximately US$315 million per year, including high income country sales of the four first-line drugs commonly used to treat drug susceptible disease. Although researchers found that a number of factors limited the ability to estimate the global market for treatment for drug resistant disease, they were able to determine that US$54 million is spent annually on the more expensive, second-line treatments in the ten countries studied.

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