Long-Term Outcomes for Prostate Cancer Show IMRT Curative

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Prostate Cancer and IMRT

Results from the largest study of men with prostate cancer treated with high-dose, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) show that the majority of patients remain alive with no evidence of disease after an average follow-up period of eight years. The 561 prostate cancer patients treated with IMRT at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center were classified into prognostic risk groups. After an average of eight years, 89 percent of the men in the favorable risk group were disease-free and none of the men in any group developed secondary cancers as a result of the radiation therapy. This report, published in the October 2006 issue of The Journal of Urology, is the first description of long-term outcomes for prostate cancer patients using IMRT.

"Our results suggest that IMRT should be the treatment of choice for delivering high-dose, external beam radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer," said Dr. Michael J. Zelefsky, Chief of the Brachytherapy Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering. "We were able to show long-term safety and long-term efficacy in a very diverse group of prostate cancer patients that we followed

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