Unstable Economy Leading To Executive Stress

Armen Hareyan's picture
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More and more executives admit that stress is affecting their jobs and health. With an unpredictable economy, pressure to maintain profitability and increased responsibilities, you've got a high stress environment. "It's no wonder that stress is high on the list of executive concerns this year," says Dr. Juan Remos, Director of Wellness and Regenerative Medicine at Miami Institute of Age Management and Intervention.

Dr. Remos and his colleagues see hundreds of patients a year through the Miami Institute's Wellness Health Program. Not all stress is bad. Whether you're an executive or not, some degree of stress is a necessary part of life. Stress can be positive when it provides motivation to achieve your goals, Remos says. "However, when you have too much stress, or it lasts too long, it can be harmful to your health."

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The Miami Institute, located within the Four Seasons Hotel and Tower in Miami, Florida offers a weekend - as well as long term stress relief packages that are tailor made to each patient. "Our clientele are very busy and important people," explains Stephen A. Watson, co-founder and owner of the luxurious 9,000 square foot facility. "We aim to help alleviate their stress related concerns with our Wellness Program, and if desired add some of our aesthetics services for a total package."

Stress particularly affects the adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys. These glands secrete adrenaline, as well as cortisol and other hormones working in tandem with the thyroid glands to mediate the body's metabolism in response to stress.

Taking a stress inventory can help you reduce stress by pinpointing the cause. Problems in the office, the death of a loved one and relationship issues are obvious, but daily hassles and demands are easy to overlook. "Persistent little things like commuting, unproductive meetings, too many commitments and family arguments can wreak more havoc on your health over time than the intermittent big things," Remos says. He suggests identifying the stressors and using the four ways to cope: Accept the situation, avoid it, alter it or adapt to it. "Focus on changing the things you can and accepting the things you cannot," Remos says.

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Comments

I personally agree with you when you say that stress is harmful to ones health. If we look at the current situation in Zimbabwe, we find that people are no more getting sick from diseases, but from the stressing environment.
I personally agree with you when you say that stress is harmful to ones health. If we look at the current situation in Zimbabwe, we find that people are no more getting sick from diseases, but from the stressing environment.