Reduce Stress Hormones To Beat Sleep Problems

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Stress can ruin your whole day ... and your whole night, too. According to NIH estimates, at least 60 million Americans annually suffer from occasional sleeplessness, and the stress of modern living can play a major role.

"Stress and sleep are not comfortable bed partners," explains Cheryl Myers, Vice President of Health Sciences for Enzymatic Therapy (ETI). "But many people don't recognize that stress may be the reason they're counting sheep at night."

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"If you're running at high rev and the body's stress hormones remain elevated, it can be difficult to unwind and fall asleep. These stress hormones can short circuit the usual biorhythms that occur as the body prepares for sleep."

Enzymatic Therapy has just introduced a valerian-free, stress-reducing sleep aid to promote overall relaxation and support a healthy sleep cycle with the use of non-habit forming ingredients.

A recent 28-day trial conducted by ETI found that the Sleep Tonight! formula produced a dramatic reduction in stress during the course of the study. Cortisol, a stress-related hormone, can interfere with healthy sleep. Salivary cortisol levels decreased by more than 60% after the first dose of Sleep Tonight! The effect continued throughout the duration of the study, averaging a 75-83% reduction in cortisol. The valerian-free formula presented no side effects and was shown to be well tolerated by participants.

Keeping cortisol in check is also a good prescription for overall health. Associated with the fight-flight stress response, cortisol can impact blood sugar, bone density, muscle tissue, blood pressure and immunity. Cholesterol researcher Dennis Goodman, MD, FACC, explains, "Elevated cortisol hits you in the gut and then in your heart. It manifests as increased abdominal fat, which can have a negative impact on heart health, including lowering levels of 'good' cholesterol (HDL)." Goodman, former Chief of Cardiology at Scripps Memorial Hospital is currently at Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine and Clinical Associate Professor at U.C., San Diego.

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