Cryolife Once Again Severely Maims An Innocent Knee Surgery Patient

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Cryolife has once again severely maimed an elective knee surgery patient, Michael Hohenbery, with a contaminated infected knee tissue implant. Shockingly the same deadly organism that devastated Mr. Hohenbery took the life of young Brian Lykins of Minnesota in 2001.

The Lykins' death, another of the Keenan Law Firm's clients, first alerted the nation of the unregulated cadaver tissue billion dollar industry. Brian's death led the FDA shutdown in 2002 of Cryolife's tissue business and the passage of 900 plus pages of safety regulations which at the time of passage were insufficient and created large loopholes.

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The FDA eventually after a year in mid 2003 permitted Cryolife to resume distribution of cadaver tissue but yet less than 30 days later a teenager from Denver was catastrophically infected by diseased knee cadaver tissue. Over the years many lawsuits have been prosecuted across the United Stated, Europe, and other countries concerning unsafe cadaver processing practices.

The recent victim Michael Hohenbery a farm equipment mechanic from downstate Illinois can no longer work and will be on mega antibiotics and pain medications the rest of his life. His suit will be filed Friday in Cobb County the location of Cryolife.

The Hohenbery case once again proves the unsafe and dangerous practices of Cryolife and the ineffectiveness of the safety regulations. While all states require licensure, testing and health certificates for barbers, nail salon technicians, and masseuses, there are no regulations regarding the qualifications of anyone handling and processing cadaver tissue.

"With over one million operations a year using cadaver tissues, how many more people will die or be seriously injured from dangerous unsafe practices of Cryolife. This travesty must stop," said Don Keenan attorney for Michael Hohenbery.

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