Complications in Diabetes Patients Can Be Increased By Panic Attacks

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Diabetes Management

People with diabetes who have repeated panic attacks are less likely to have properly managed the disease and suffer more severe health complications and poorer quality of life, a new study finds.

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Lead author Evette Ludman, Ph.D., a researcher with Group Health Cooperative in Seattle, said her group's previous work showed depression was associated with more poorly controlled glucose, more diabetes symptoms and lower functioning. "But because panic and depression so often go hand in hand, we weren't certain that patients who have panic, independent of depression, would also have with these indicators."

For the new study, which appears in the November issue of General Hospital Psychiatry, a survey was mailed to 4,385 patients with diabetes. Of those participants, 193 (4.4 percent) reported having panic episodes that caused a definite change in behavior. Among the 193 patients, 54.5 percent also had symptoms of depression.

Respondents were asked about recent panic or fear "spells" and if these feelings forced them to change their behavior. Participants were also given questionnaires that measured their diabetes symptoms as well as their level of functioning and disability.

Of those with panic disorder, the average HbA1c levels

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