Scientists Identify New Mechanism Of Insulin Resistance

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Insulin Resistance

Resistance to insulin that precedes type 2 diabetes may stem from a "metabolic traffic jam" that blocks the body's ability to switch between glucose and fat as energy sources, say researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

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Normal blood glucose (sugar) control depends on insulin, a hormone that's released after eating that stimulates sugar uptake in muscles and other parts of the body. Insulin resistance arises when the body no longer responds to insulin's signals. It's a serious condition that often accompanies obesity and increases risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a disease marked by dangerously high blood sugar levels. Scientists have been studying the disorder for years, but have not been able to agree upon its root cause.

But Debbie Muoio, an assistant professor of medicine in Duke's Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center thinks she may have a pretty good idea. She and her colleagues trace the development of insulin resistance to overworked mitochondria

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