Cobalamin Demonstrates Ability To Reduce Glucose Levels

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Blood Glucose Levels

Access Pharmaceuticals has demonstrated the ability, using the company's proprietary Cobalamin technology, to significantly reduce glucose levels in an animal model of diabetes, through its oral insulin product candidate. Several formulations using Cobalamin, which is based upon the body's natural absorption of vitamin B12 in the gastrointestinal tract, were tested in an animal model of diabetes. Additional pre-clinical studies are planned.

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Access has patents and formulations based on vitamin B12 attachment to polymers and nanoparticles which carry an attached or encapsulated drug. The vitamin B12 absorption mechanism transfers the macrostructure from the gut to blood, facilitating the absorption of drugs that otherwise could not be delivered orally. Access' Cobalamin technology has the potential to enable and improve oral bioavailability of active drugs which currently have to be administered by injection, including proteins, antibodies and siRNA.

"While Access already has proof-of-principle data using this technology with a variety of proteins and peptides, we are delighted to have attained preclinical study results which indicate that a meaningful pharmacological effect can be achieved," stated Dr. David P. Nowotnik, Access' Senior Vice President, Research and Development. "As a result of this very promising result, we plan to complete a short series of formulation optimization studies and then to select a clinical development candidate."

Access intends to develop the Cobalamin oral delivery technology in collaboration with other pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Access has in the past and continues to conduct sponsored research programs with leading pharmaceutical companies based on its Cobalamin technology. The company is also actively seeking additional partners for both its oral insulin and other potential programs.

"While the primary focus of our company remains the development of products for the treatment and supportive care of cancer patients, we are excited by these promising results in an animal model," added Stephen R. Seiler, Access' President and CEO. "In addition to providing a potential oral delivery option for insulin which would be attractive to a large number of pharmaceutical companies and which we would develop in partnership with a collaborator, we believe that our Cobalamin technology has applicability to a variety of cancer products, such as LHRH which are part of our developing cancer and supportive care franchise."

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