Diabetes Drug Supported By Mexican Diabetes Federation

Armen Hareyan's picture
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Mexican Diabetes Federation has given Biotech's "Sucanon" diabetes drug its support in an overview of diabetic drugs published in the May-June 2007 issue of Diabetes Hoy.

The overview of diabetic drugs, written by Dr. Roberto Cepeda Gonzalez, Medical Director of the Specialized Center for Diabetes, in Mexico City, notes that Sucanon falls in a category of diabetic drugs known as "insulin sensitizers" for their action in making the body's cells more sensitive to circulating insulin. The review notes that the most widely used insulin sensitizers belong to a family of drugs known as thiazolidinediones or glitazones.

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The glitazone drugs, the review notes, have a history of problems in contrast with Sucanon which, clinical studies have indicated, is very safe. The review notes that Sucanon does not have any of the hepatotoxicity or liver-damage risks of the glitazone drugs. The first glitazone, troglitazone was approved in 1998 but was withdrawn shortly thereafter. Two additional glitazones - rosiglitazone and pioglitazone - have recently been targeted with a "black box" warning by the U.S. FDA due to concerns related to cardiac risk when taking these drugs.

The review in Diabetes Hoy also notes that another widely used Type II Diabetes medication, metformin, presents risks for patients with compromised kidney function, frequently a symptom of Type II Diabetes.

Sucanon, which received regulatory approval in Mexico in 2004, is widely sold in that country on a non-prescription basis through a range of retailers including Costco and Walmart.

Sucanon is now also available without prescription to diabetics in countries worldwide, including the U.S. and Canada, which permit import of otherwise-unavailable drugs for direct personal use.

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