Aging Population Faces High Rates Of Arthritis

Ruzanna Harutyunyan's picture
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When asked if they are disabled, more Americans who say yes report ‘arthritis or rheumatism’ as the most common culprit. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study found that, by the year 2030, the number of disabled Americans will skyrocket 40 percent, affecting more than 67 million people.

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In Utah, more than one in five Utah adults lives with arthritis. Nationally, nearly one-third of Americans say arthritis limits their ability to work. But research shows that engaging in joint-friendly activities like walking, swimming, and strength training helps decrease disability. The Utah Arthritis Program promotes a variety of programs that have been specially designed to keep people with arthritis healthy and active.

And studies show arthritis patients who exercise regularly have less pain and better range of motion than those who don’t. The most effective programs offered in Utah today are Living Well with Chronic Conditions and the Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program.

"These two programs greatly benefit participants, said Nicole Bissonette, Arthritis Program Manager for the Utah Department of Health. “They teach appropriate exercises, proper medication use, healthy eating, and how to communicate effectively with family, friends, and their health care providers,” she added.

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