Trial Finds Increased Prevalence Of Drug Metabolism Deficiencies In Psychotropic Side Effects

Ruzanna Harutyunyan's picture
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Results from a clinical study published in the current issue of the Future Medicine Group (London) journal Personalized Medicine (Vol. 5, No. 6, pp. 579-587, 2008) are helping to point the way toward the application of DNA-guided medicine to predict psychotropic side effects. The study was conducted at The Institute of Living of Hartford Hospital in collaboration with Genomas.

The CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genes from the cytochrome P450 family were chosen for DNA typing because their common variants result in deficient metabolic capacity for many psychotropic drugs. Combinatorial gene analysis revealed that 57 percent of individuals in the psychiatric population were carriers of multiple gene variations associated with no or poor drug metabolism capacity on 2 or 3 genes compared to 36 percent of individuals in the control population.

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Individuals that are multiply deficient in CYP450 metabolic routes are at risk for developing serious side effects to a variety of psychotropic medications.

"We found clear evidence that there were significantly more innate drug metabolism deficiencies based on the gene variants predominantly observed in the population experiencing side effects," said Gualberto Ruano, M.D., Ph.D., President and CEO of Genomas, and Director of Genetics Research, Hartford Hospital.

"Our goal is to enhance patient safety by preventing predictable side effects and at the same time build the case for DNA typing in the optimized utilization of health care resources. We are integrating this clinical experience with development of our PhyzioType Systems for DNA-Guided Medicine."

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