Prevent Cold, Flu With NOZIN Nasal Sanitizer

Ruzanna Harutyunyan's picture
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An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure and some dollars. Each year the cold and flu season can wreak havoc on people and their wallets. According to the National Institutes of Health, cold and flu have an annual economic impact in the U.S. of over $30 billion from missed school or work. Over 100 million doctor visits cost Americans $7.7 billion per year, plus the added expense of medicine and treatments.

The key to cost saving health care and the best way to avoid the distress of colds and flu is with sensible prevention. Important preventive steps recommended by the Centers for Disease Control include washing hands, avoiding touching your nose, keeping away from sick people and getting the flu vaccine. Now, NOZIN Nasal Sanitizer offers another tool to bolster the fight against cold and flu germs.

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The first sanitizer of its kind, NOZIN is a non-prescription, natural antiseptic designed to fight harmful germs at the primary site of infection - the nose. Within seconds of washing with hand sanitizers or soaps, new germs can be picked up. Then if you touch your nose or breathe in germs you could get sick. Tests show NOZIN kills 99.9% of common disease-causing germs and creates a nasal barrier to fight germs for up to 8 hours, providing a new level of defense to help avoid sickness during cold and flu season.

Dr. Richard Bailey, an Ear, Nose and Throat doctor from Arizona, comments, "I recommend NOZIN to patients for safe and effective preventive hygiene. I personally use NOZIN everyday."

A citrus-scented solution applied with a swab to the inside tip of the nose, NOZIN contains pharmaceutical-grade ethyl alcohol, natural ingredients and plant-based antimicrobial compounds. Testing at independent, FDA-recognized facilities has shown NOZIN to be safe and 99.9% effective against germs known to cause cold and flu symptoms. The product is for daily hygiene and for use before entering areas such as offices, classrooms and airplanes.

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