New Documentary Explores Why Humans Age

Ruzanna Harutyunyan's picture
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Why Humans Age is the title of an 8-minute documentary film narrated by Bill Sardi, co-founder and formulator of Longevinex (long-jev-in-ex), a nutriceutical product designed to promote healthy aging.

The film presents the "overmineralization" theory of aging -- that humans begin to age biologically only after full childhood growth is achieved.

While there are many theories of aging (hormonal, free radical, wear and tear), the overmineralization theory is the only explanation for why humans age at three different speeds:

1. no biological aging during the childhood growth years, characterized by the shuttling of calcium, iron and copper to make new bones, red blood cells and collagen;

2. accumulation of these minerals once childhood growth has ceased and progressive aging, as evidenced by the buildup of cellular debris called lipofuscin;

3. a slight decline in the rate of aging in late life, which has been correlated with reaching a steady state of minerals. For example, iron stores do not increase any further.

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The film explains why women live, on average, about 5 to 8 years longer than males. Women do not begin to accumulate minerals until they have reached menopause. During their fertile years, losses of iron and copper during menstruation, and donation of calcium to offspring, explains why women avoid the "rusting and calcification" seen in full-grown males.

The film explains why males at age 40 have double the amount of iron and four times as much calcium in their bodies compared to an equally aged female, and experience double the rate of diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

The film demonstrates how natural mineral chelating (key-lay-ting) molecules, such as those provided in Longevinex, can reduce overmineralization and turn back the clock hands of biological time.

The film depicts a first-of-its-kind experiment where measurement of lipofuscin was performed by direct photography of the retina at the back of the eyes of an 80-year old man, and then Longevinex was employed for 5 months, and was found to reduce cellular debris (lipofuscin). This intervention correlated with improvement in five measurable parameters of vision (visual acuity, night, color, contrast and side vision).

The film suggests a day when retinal photographs will measure lipofuscin levels to determine the biological age of an individual, and natural mineral-chelating molecules will be employed to turn back biological time. The removal of lipofuscin would remove any theoretical limits on the maximum achievable lifespan of humans.

The film was produced by Michael Gonzales and Associates and is available for viewing at www.longevinex.com.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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