New York Schools Receive Program For Children With Autism

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The TV Teacher, LLC announces the donation of their video-modeling programs to special-needs classes in select New York City schools: Queens, Bronx, and Staten Island.

The award-winning handwriting program, Alphabet Beats was co-created by Susan Ellis, a mother struggling to help her frustrated five-year-old son with Autism learn to write the alphabet. After an unsuccessful two years of "traditional" therapy, she realized she must teach her son, Ryan, through the tool he responds to best: television. Together with her son's occupational therapist, Marnie Danielson, they made a three-minute video and Ryan finally began to write a letter within minutes!

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Their amazing discovery prompted the two to become business partners and produce a professional DVD writing program that is now being used by parents, schools, and therapists across the country. "In each letter chapter," says Danielson, "we use video-modeling together with a catchy rhythmic chant that children can remember. Our additional props and skits make it fun -- keeping the child engaged. Even the most frustrated children are finally paying attention and motor-planning for the first time using our program."

"Our company has had tremendous support from the Autism community," says Ellis. "So when Marnie and I were discussing recipients of our donation fund this year, I was reminded of a meeting I had with Suzanne Wright, co-founder of Autism Speaks. Suzanne told me of her visit to a single school in New York with several dozen classrooms completely full of children with Autism. The sheer volume was shocking."

"We believe our donation of over $2,000 worth of our Alphabet Beats and Strokes, Shapes & Scenes programs sent directly to select schools that desperately need them, but simply don't have the budget to afford them, will help their students tremendously," says Danielson.

"We were able to identify some wonderful public schools in New York that have many classes dedicated to helping those with Autism," says Ellis. "They are as excited to receive our program, as we are to donate them! As we were able to do with my own son, to give a present that can help a child become less frustrated and more independent, is the best gift we could ever give."

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