Trust Me: I'm Not A Veterinarian

Ruzanna Harutyunyan's picture
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Your animal buddy can't read it. Your vet may not read it. But you can read it for your pet -- and that may save your pet's life.

That's the reason Jim Schwartz wrote the book:

* to save one dog at a time;
* to stop harmful over-vaccination of our pets;
* to question common vet practices that may harm your animal companion;
* to describe an insurance plan that will reduce "economic euthanasia";
* to propose a legislative approach to saving companion animals;
* to raise some ideas about pet care that you may be taking for granted;
* and to respectfully suggest some ways you might tell if your pet is ready to check out of your world.

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Is this a controversial book? Heck, yes! Will vets like it? Only if they are open to some ideas not taught in vet school. Will pets be glad you read it? You betcha.

Would local veterinarian associations object to a favorable review? Probably. Would this book appeal to media who don't mind generating some controversy, as long as it's well-documented? Yes.

Author Jim Schwartz says, "Should you care what interest-conflicted vets think? Not if you care for your pet. The point is that if you have pets you should read this book on their account -- to improve their health and lengthen their lifespans."

In "Trust Me: I'm Not a Veterinarian!," Schwartz has created what amounts to a pet owner's self-defense manual, offering advice on everything from pet cremation to up-to-the-minute facts on controversial pet vaccination practices and the frequent life-threatening or fatal results vaccination can have on older animals.

Experience with vaccination and his dogs Buddy, Nicki, Moolah, Elle, Max, Ricki and Moses led Schwartz to question and examine the science, practice and public policy of pet vaccination, leading him to the conclusion that veterinary vaccination practices, evidently dangerous to pet health, are in actuality a huge cash stream to small-animal vet practices. In his book, Schwartz deconstructs the financial and legislative implications for our pets that, in most cases, function as family members.

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