Poor Diet Metabolism, Lack of Exercise Increases Asthma Risk in Kids

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Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors which can result in heart disease and diabetes. Researchers have now found that poor diet and lack of exercise that lead to an imbalance in metabolism may also increase a child’s risk of developing asthma.

Controlling Weight and Lipid Levels with Diet and Exercise May Also Prevent Asthma

Dr. Giovanni Piedimonte and researchers from West Virginia University School of Medicine analyzed data from nearly 18,000 children aged 4 to 12 years who were taking part in the Coronary Artery Risk Detection in Appalachian Communities (CARDIAC) project. Factors considered included triglyceride levels and evidence of acanthosis nigricans, which are raised patches of brown skin that are often biomarkers for insulin resistance.

The team also considered body mass index or BMI, and almost 21% of the children were considered obese. Fourteen percent of the children had asthma.

Read: Replace Burgers with Fruits and Veggies to Lower Childhood Asthma Risk

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The researchers found that asthma prevalence among the children was strongly associated with certain symptoms of metabolic syndrome including dyslipidemia and abnormal glucose metabolism, but not weight status. Although those who were obese were more likely to have asthma, even children of a healthy weight who had imbalanced metabolism were at increased risk.

Certain metabolic factors participate in the asthma disease process by contributing to inflammation of the airways in the lungs and hyperreactivity (contraction of smooth muscle in the bronchial walls), says Dr. Piedimonte. He says that strict monitoring and control of triglyceride and glucose levels early in life may play a role in the management of chronic asthma in children.

Read: Fatty Meal Can Increase Lung Inflammation in Asthmatic Patients

Dr. Piedimonte would like to see the findings used as further support for universal lipid screening in children. “The rationale is that by using selective screening, we would have missed over a third of children with significant genetic dyslipidemia,” he said.

Both poor diet – one lacking in antioxidants but high in fat - and inadequate exercise play a role in the metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that increase the risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. The goal of treatment is often weight loss (if overweight), a minimum of 30 minutes of daily moderate intensity exercise, and a lowering of cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar through diet or medication.

Source reference:
Cottrell L, et al "Metabolic abnormalities in children with asthma" Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010; DOI: 10.1164/rccm.201004-0603OC.

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Comments

Wow-I never knew that.
i would like you to write more about what lack of exercise can cause.