Some members of PTSD Soldier Families Also Show Becan to Show Stress Symptoms

Lena Kirakosyan's picture
soldier calming stress with a dog

Stress and depression are contagious. Physicians working with soldiers who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) note that some members of these soldiers’ families also began to show symptoms associated with these conditions over time, despite the fact that they never served in the army.

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Scientists from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) at the University of Calgary tried to find an explanation for this phenomenon. They studied the effect of stress on several pairs of mice.

To begin with, the researchers divided the pairs of rodents, after which one member of the pair was subjected to stress. Then the pair was reunited. Scientists studied the reaction and changes in the brain cells.

As a result, in both rodents, the brain networks changed in the same way.

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"This gives us a reason to say that stress and depression are contagious," says Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology, Jaidep Baines. It was his colleagues who discovered that stress transferred from others could change the brain.

However, according to Dr. Sterly, it is interesting not only to confirm the infectiousness of stress, but to also note that, in some cases, the effects of stress disorders could be reversed. But it seemed that this can only be done in females.

"This shows doctors that the treatment of stress and depressive conditions in men and women should be conducted with different strategies. Personalized approaches for treatment should be developed.”

Reference: KP

Also see: St John’s Wort is a safe and efficient treatment for depression and anxiety. What natural ways do you use to calm stress or treat depression naturally?

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