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Women Who Increase Their Coffee Intake May Benefit in the Fight Against Fat

Timothy Boyer Ph.D.'s picture
Two to three cups of coffee per day benefits body fat percentages.

A new study reveals that women with less total body and less abdominal fat, drink more coffee than those who drink coffee occasionally or not at all. In addition, this appears to benefit 40-something and older women even more when they drink up to a specific number of cups of coffee per day.

Counting Calories in Your Café Latte

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A news release from Anglia Ruskin University reports that a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition reveals an association between how many cups of coffee a woman drinks per day and her total body and abdominal fat composition.

Using accumulated data from study participants aged 20–69 that consisted of individuals habitually drinking either no coffee daily, less than 1 cup per day, 1 cup per day, 2-3 cups per day, and 4 cups or more per day—in addition to looking at their individual total fat and abdominal fat percentages—researchers statistically age-adjusted the data and analyzed the probability of an association between coffee consumption and body fat.

What the researchers found was that:

1. Women aged 20-44 who drank two or three cups of coffee per day had the lowest levels of adiposity, 3.4% lower than people who did not consume coffee.

2. Women aged 45-69 who drank four or more cups per day fared better and had an adiposity percentage of 4.1% lower.

3. Among men, the relationship was less significant: men aged 20-44 who drank two or three cups per day had 1.3% less total fat and 1.8% less trunk fat than those who did not consume coffee at all.

Interestingly, the findings were consistent whether the coffee consumed was caffeinated or decaffeinated. Furthermore, between smokers and non-smokers and those suffering from chronic diseases or who are in good health, the numbers held true regarding the association between cups of coffee and body fat.

The study concluded that there is a gender difference involving sex and the number of cups of coffee drank daily with respect to body fat composition; and, that for women there is a significant association between higher coffee consumption (2-3 cups per day) and lower adiposity—especially with 40-something and older women who appear to benefit from drinking 4 or more cups of coffee per day.

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According to the study’s senior author, Dr. Lee Smith, Reader in Public Health at Anglia Ruskin University:

“Our research suggests that there may be bioactive compounds in coffee other than caffeine that regulate weight and which could potentially be used as anti-obesity compounds.”

“It could be that coffee, or its effective ingredients, could be integrated into a healthy diet strategy to reduce the burden of chronic conditions related to the obesity epidemic.”

For more about coffee and the fight against fat, here are some Dr. Oz recommended Coffee Choices that Won't Add Inches to Your Waist.

Timothy Boyer has a Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Arizona. For 20+ years he has been employed as a freelance health and science writer. Timothy continues writing about science with a focus on the connection between coffee and healthy living. For continual updates about the benefits of coffee on your health, you can also follow Timothy on Twitter at TimBoyerWrites.

Image courtesy of Pixabay

References:

Coffee linked to lower body fat in women” Anglia Ruskin University ARU News Release May 2020.

Regular Coffee Consumption Is Associated with Lower Regional Adiposity Measured by DXA among US Women” Lee Smith, Lin Yang, Shengxu Li, Shahrokh F Shariat, Thomas Waldhoer, Tianlin Xu, Yunan Han, Mohammad Abufaraj, Qinran Liu, Chao Cao. The Journal of Nutrition, 2020; DOI: 10.1093/jn/nxaa121

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