Controlling Yeast infection can be a treatment for autism

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Apr 27 2017 - 10:53pm
Controlling Yeast infection can be a treatment for autism

The debate on what causes autism continues, but recent findings have confirmed that there is a gut brain connection that is disrupted in autistic people, and it is been discovered to be caused by an aggressive form of candida. This yeast infection causes havoc in the system, leading neurological issues, which are later labelled as autism. Therefore, controlling yeast infection can be a treatment for autism, and there is a case study to prove it.

Researchers from the Department of Experimental Medicine SUN-Second University in Italy, have conducted an experiment in which autistic patients stool samples were cultured. This simple experiment confirmed the theory that autistic patients have a deregulated gut functioning, which causes neurological issues, because the gut microbiota can modulate brain function. In this study, scientists found that in over half of the subjects, there was present an aggressive form of candida that causes yeast infection.

But, 5 more specific things were uncovered in this study: 1) Most dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) appears sustained by lowered Lactobacillusspp. and decreased number of Clostridium spp. 2) Absence of C. difficilis and its toxins in ASDs 3) Low-mild gut inflammation and augmented intestinal permeability were demonstrated together with the presence of GI symptoms 4) Significant linear correlation was found between disease severity and calprotectin and Clostridiumspp. Presence 5) Gastro Intestinal symptoms, such as constipation and alternating bowel, did correlate (multivariate analyses) with the increased permeability to lactulose.

Bellow, the implications of these fidings are addressed in terms of what they mean mean for the body, and how controlling yeast infection can be a treatment for autism

Lowered Lactobacillusspp., decreased number of Clostridiumspp and absence of C. difficilis

The human gastrointestinal tract is an ecosystem rich in microbial species where the Clostridium genus plays an important role. There are more than 200 known Clostridium spp. at least 30 are associated with human disease. This bacteria is well known as a gut colonizer, which is found significantly in infants and adults.

Lactobacillus spp. are important in human health, because they are part of the gastrointestinal endogenous flora and as a regulator of the vaginal ecosystem in women in their reproductive age. However, they are known also as pathogens, responsible for the septicaemia in immunocompromised patient, in cytolytic vaginosis and in lactobacillus's.

C. difficile bacteria is different in different age groups; it is highest in infants and decreases with age. During infancy, asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile in the gastrointestinal tract is very common. Many infants are colonized by C. difficile strains during the first 2 years of life but this colonization is rarely associated with C. difficile infection.

Calprotectin and Clostridiumspp presence

In the study at the Italian University, scientists found a significant linear correlation found between disease severity and calprotectin and Clostridiumspp. presence. This is a very consistent finding that confirm other studies, which have discovered that fecal calprotectin levels directly reflects the intestinal inflammation status of a patient and also the severity of clostridium difficile Infection, which causes fever, abdominal cramping, diarrhoea, bloating, or blood in stool.

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