Vegan Foods That May Be More Effective Than Gardasil Against HPV

Sep 6 2017 - 5:51pm
Vegan Diet HPV Epstein Barr Virus Cervical Cancer

HPV is a popular and very common viral disease that is believed to cause cervical cancer in some women. While research may have pinpointed the real cause of cervical cancer there are a few highly alkalizing vegan foods that may be more effective in helping to prevent a cervical cancer outcome.

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HPV is one of the most commonly transferred Sexually Transmitted Infections among teens and young adults in the world. According to the CDC, about 14 million people become newly infected with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) each year. It is highly contagious.

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HPV is so common that most sexually-active men and women will get at least one type of HPV at some point in their lifetime. HPV is characterized as genital warts. Although typically HPV is not dangerous, breakouts can be bothersome. It has also been associated with cervical cancer, but research is showing that HPV may have a helper creating that result.

Epstein Barr Virus Causes Cervical Cancer, Not HPV

Anthony William, NY Best Selling Author of Life-Changing Foods: Save Yourself and the Ones You Love with the Hidden Healing Powers of Fruits & Vegetables, had this to say about HPV on his weekly radio show:

"The word has started that HPV creates cervical and ovarian cancer. HPV is always present, but it is EBV that creates all the ovarian cancers, all cervical cancers and all the uterus cancers. The more EBV that women have in the reproductive system, the more HPV, because the immune system is lower, the immune system of the reproductive system has dropped down, so you have higher HPV. If you are eating well and your doctor says that your HPV is going down, the chances are you have knocked down EBV as well. "

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Research Backs This Claim Up

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In a study published In Virology Journal 58 randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, were examined for EBV and HPV infections.

HPV infection was found in 88% of patients with squamous cell carcinomas: 75% were low-grade and 95% were high grade lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of squamous cell carcinomas, and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HPV and EBV) was found in 67% of squamous cell carcinoma cases.

"The long period of time (years) it takes for the development of cervical cancer after HPV infection suggests the involvement of other etiologies (such as viruses or cell compounds) in malignancy process."

Research concluded that the high rate of HPV and Epstein Barr Virus co-infection in squamous cell carcinomas suggests that Epstein Barr Virus infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation.

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Foods That Knock Down The HPV/EBV Viral Load

It is possible to knock down EBV and consequently HPV specifically by eating more high alkaline vegan foods and taking dairy and eggs out of your diet. William says "it’s very important to bring in foods that are highly alkaline like spinach, wild blueberries, and romaine lettuce."

Juicing and eating more alkalizing foods by adopting a plant-based vegan lifestyle may in the end, be more effective in preventing cervical cancer and have less Gardasil risks. If you can, drink green smoothies daily with fresh fruit, water and spinach blended together. Drink a freshly made juice each day of romaine lettuce, parsley and cucumber. Focus on reducing acids and hormones in your diet and body and these foods help with that. William recommends eating more black beans since they are phytoestrogenic and reduce the hormones, estrogens and the toxic estrogens that come from plastics and other places.

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