Here's Why A Vegetarian Diet Trumps Aspirin Therapy For Heart Trouble

Vegetarian Diet High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Diet Nutrition

The least talked about cause of high blood pressure and its resulting heart disease and stroke risk is thickening of the blood. Undoubtedly, thick blood is a result of a high-fat diet, particularly, a diet high in animal products. Many are treated with blood thinning medications, or anticoagulants, and many are put on aspirin therapy, but is a natural alternative that is longer lasting.

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Statistics show that aspirin use has increased with age. Almost half (48.5 percent) of those age 65 and over reported taking aspirin every day or every other day as compared with about one-fourth (27.0 percent) of those age 45 to 64. Among those who were 65 and older and were told that they had indicators of heart disease, nearly two-thirds (63.7 percent) reported taking aspirin every day or every other day compared with 41.4 percent of those in the same age group who were never told that they had indicators of heart disease.

Risks of Aspirin Therapy

While aspirin works to think the blood, this is a short-term fix that comes with some risk. According to a report from Harvard, because aspirin as the ability to reduce clots, it also has the ability to cause gastrointestinal and brain bleeding, especially with some conditions like uncontrolled high blood pressure, and ulcers.

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The Best Blood Thinner Is A Vegetarian Diet

While it may be easier to pop an aspirin every day than change your diet, the fact remains that thickened blood is a diet-related condition that is years in the making. It is also a condition that can be reversed. The vitamins and nutrients in certain foods can act as natural blood thinners. There is a diet that can help to thin your blood naturally.

The study published in JAMA conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials and observational studies that have examined the association between vegetarian diets and blood pressure. MEDLINE and Web of Science were searched for articles published in English from 1946 to October 2013 and from 1900 to November 2013, respectively.

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Each of the studies reviewed met the inclusion criteria of the use of (1) participants older than 20 years, (2) vegetarian diets as an exposure or intervention, (3) mean difference in blood pressure as an outcome, and (4) a controlled trial or observational study design. In addition, none met the exclusion criteria of (1) use of twin participants, (2) use of multiple interventions, (3) reporting only categorical BP data, or (4) reliance on case series or case reports.

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Vegetarians Have Lower Blood Pressure

Net differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressure associated with the consumption of vegetarian diets were assessed. Of the 258 studies identified, 7 clinical trials and 32 observational studies met the inclusion criteria. In the 7 controlled trials (a total of 311 participants; mean age, 44.5 years), consumption of vegetarian diets was associated with a reduction in mean systolic blood pressure, compared with the consumption of omnivorous diets.

In the 32 observational studies (a total of 21 604 participants; with an average age of, 46.6 years), consumption of vegetarian diets was associated with a lower average systolic blood pressure compared with the consumption of omnivorous diets.

The study concluded that consumption of vegetarian diets is associated with lower blood pressure. Such diets could be a useful non-pharmacologic means for reducing blood pressure.

How To Thin Your Blood

You can thin your blood by removing animal products from your diet, as well as oils and trans fats from processed foods. Eating a low-fat plant-based vegetarian diet will relieve your body of its fat burden, ultimately reversing high blood pressure, eliminating the threat of heart disease, colon cancer and more.

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