Teen Sex in Committed Relationship Doesn't Effect Academics

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Researchers from the University of California Davis as well as the University of Minnesota have been researching teenage experiences of studying and sex. The data was gathered from more than 90,000 teenagers who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ages 11 to 17) and the Adolescent Health Academic Achievement Study.

Researchers wanted to know if sex interfered with performance in the school, future aspirations, problems in the school, skipped classes, suspended from the class and dropped out cases.

Researchers concluded that sexually active teenagers do not suffer academically and teens in a committed relationship do not do worse or better than peers who have abstained from sex. It is important to note that researchers found that teenager who have “flings” and sex in non-committed relationship might see a drop in GPA.

The Guttmacher Institute has found that almost half (46%) of all 15–19-year-olds have had sex at least once in the US. By age 15, only 13% of never-married teens have ever had sex. However, by the time they reach age 19, seven in 10 never-married teens have engaged in sexual intercourse.

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The results of the findings showed that sexually active teenagers do not necessarily suffer academically and teen those who had sex in committed relationships performed just as well as those who stayed virgins.

Teen Sex and Effect on Academic Performance

Teen who had sex without a committed relationship were more likely to experience problems at school, be suspended or expelled, were less likely to expect to go to university and had lower grades than those in relationships.

Researchers feel the study could show positive outcomes with the teenage sex and may encourage teenagers however, the public should not overlook the ever growing prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among adolescents. Studies show that teenagers have a limited understanding of this growing epidemic of STDs and of public health strategies that might bring it under control.

In fact, according to 2005 ASHA State of the Nation, half of all new HIV infections occur among adolescents concluding that teens may not have the ability to understand the consequences.

The Guttmacher Institute reports that almost half of all 15–19-year-olds have had sex at least once in the US. By age 15, only 13% of never-married teens have ever had sex. However, by the time they reach age 19, seven in 10 never-married teens have engaged in sexual intercourse.

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