New Findings Could Bring Relief if You Suffer From Nut Allergies

Mar 28 2017 - 11:49am
tree nuts, peanuts, allergies

If you've always wanted to enjoy a packet of nuts, or go vegan, but have been diagnosed as having a nut allergy, this might be good news for you!

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Let's Get One Thing Straight -- Peanuts Aren't Nuts

Peanuts sort of give nuts a bad rap. From sugar-filled commercial peanut butter to peanut-filled chocolates and desserts, peanuts have acquired a sort of junk food label.

It's sad, because peanuts aren't even nuts – they're legumes! Unlike tree nuts, peanuts grow underground -- just like beans, peas, and other legumes.

Tree Nuts Are Real Nuts and Are Holistically Healthy

Tree nuts, on the other hand, grow on top of the ground on trees. Raw, organic tree nuts are holistically healthy. In fact, doctors strongly advise that you eat more nuts in substitution for high-fatty foods, like bacon. They found that almost half of heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, and other heart and metabolic diseases are caused by eating not enough nuts and too many processed meats and salt.

Tree nuts give you all sorts of wonderful benefits -- Brazil nuts contain healing selenium, which protects you from dangerous free radicals and mercury poisoning. It's why it's a smart idea to eat a Brazil nut if you're having a seafood meal (since most seafood is contaminated with mercury).

Tree nuts are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which do wonders for your cognition.

And guess what? Tree nuts are a great alternative for many not-so-healthy foods. For example, switching cow's milk with almond milk means you can avoid lactose and bad fat in exchange for the more nutritious profile of almonds plus good fats.

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But if you are into all things health-related, then suddenly you are in your doctor's office and he tells you your blood work shows that you are allergic to nuts, it's pretty heartbreaking. He probably will recommend you stay away from nuts because eating them could lead to itchy lips and hives at best – and asphyxiation at worst.

Some people with nut allergy don't have symptoms when eating other types of nuts

Good news – you don't have to feel like you've been cheated out of these wonderful superfoods any longer! New research shows that about 50 percent of people diagnosed with a nut allergy don't actually experience symptoms when eating other types of tree nuts.

What's even more surprising – the study found that about 96 percent of people who were only allergic to peanuts (again, they're not even nuts) weren't allergic to tree nuts. The 4 percent that were allergic, seemed only to be allergic to hazelnuts, walnuts, and pistachios. But they were all able to eat Brazil nuts, almonds, and other kinds of tree nuts without any complications!

That means that if you're diagnosed with a nut allergy, the odds are it's actually a false reading! You could be misled to avoid these amazing tree nuts all your life when you're not even allergic to them.

Why people get diagnosed with nut allergy when they aren't allergic to nuts

Doctors explain that the reason why people get diagnosed as allergic for tree nuts while they aren't, is because the same antibodies that your body makes against peanuts (if you're allergic) cause positive test results when they test your blood for tree nuts. Using a very loose analogy, it's kind of like if you've been vaccinated for the flu – if you get tested for having the flu, the results will be positive because the vaccine caused your body to produce antibodies against the flu.

But doctors also warn you not to take these research findings too liberally. Some participants did end up having tree nut allergies with their peanut allergies – although the probability is low, you could be one of these rare exceptions. It's safest to get a more comprehensive tree nut allergy test at your doctor's office by physically eating different kinds of tree nuts and waiting to see if there's an allergic reaction under your doctor's supervision.

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